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© 2001-2024
GrandmasterA

 
Im Nachfolgenden findest Du ein Transkript des Audiokommentares zur "Back To The Future: Part III" von Bob Gale und Neil Canton, der sich nur auf den Code-1-DVDs befindet! Das Transkript ist eine Kollektivarbeit einiger Mitglieder des Forums auf BTTF.com für alle internationalen Fans, die diesen Audiokommentar nicht anhören können. Das Script ist auf Englisch (so wie der Audiokommentar). Eventuell wird es in ferner Zukunft auch eine deutsche Übersetzung geben. Momentan ist mir eine Übersetzung aus Zeitgründen leider nicht möglich. Dennoch viel Spaß beim Lesen!


Chapter 1: "Back Again" - Transcribed by "i kno it's not to scale"


Bob Gale: Hi, this is Bob Gale...

Neil Canton: ...and Neil Canton.

Bob Gale: For the third time, and the last time, because you're probably sick of hearing us talk about these movies

Neil Canton: You mean there's not going to be a Back to the Future Part IV?

[UNIVERSAL STUDIOS LOGO APPEARS ON SCREEN]

Bob Gale: [laughs] No, that's just not gonna happen. This was the first movie where Universal used this fancy, 75th anniversary logo. And this James Horner theme, I believe.

Neil Canton: Yeah, it was James Horner.

Bob Gale: Remember we actually had a conversation about whether we should use this new logo or use the old one to make all three movies consistent. But it was a big deal for the studio that we introduce the new logo with this movie and, it's just a logo, it's not that important. Unless you're the chairman of MCA.

[SHOT OF THE DELOREAN HEADED TOWARD THE LIGHTNING WIRE THAT WILL SEND THE ORIGINAL MARTY FROM 1955 BACK TO THE FUTURE]

Bob Gale: So, obviously we're using again the footage from Back to the Future Part I [which was] re-used for Back to the Future Part II, because it put you right back in the frame of mind that you were in the end of the last picture, which for audiences was about six months. Back III opened on Memorial Day weekend 1990, my birthday actually, May 25,

Neil Canton: Happy Birthday. And mine's May 30th.

Bob Gale: In about 12 or 15 cities we had screenings right before this weekend of all three movies, back-to-back-to-back. That's what they called it, "Back-to-Back-to-Back to the Future" screenings. Promotional in a lot of places with - there's radio stations. We had folks camped out and those screenings were a lot of fun. We had the true, die-hard fanatics there and they appreciated every single reference that they saw in Part III that referred back to the first two movies.

[MARTY RE-APPEARS AND RUNS TO DOC ON THE STREET, WHICH CAUSES DOC TO FAINT]

Bob Gale: The Studebaker dealership back there [in 1955] is Statler Brothers. You see the Statlers in the Old West and with the Toyota dealership in the first movie [in 1985].


Chapter 2: "Main Titles" - Transcribed by "i kno it's not to scale"


[SHOT OF DOC'S CAR BEING PARKED IN FRONT OF HIS HOUSE AND WHAT APPEARS TO BE MARTY CARRYING DOC INSIDE THE HOUSE, FOLLOWED BY TIME-LAPSED SHOTS OF DOC'S HOUSE FROM NIGHT TO MORNING]

Bob Gale: This title shot here coming up at the Gamble House, this is really a very amazing shot done with the Vista Glide camera - four or five passes on it at different times to get the effect of it going from night to morning.

Bob Gale: The camera is actually moving in closer to the house through this entire minute and a half or two-minute take. This is one of the most boring things to shoot because for most of it not much is going on.

Bob Gale: And of course, that's neither Michael J. Fox nor Christopher Lloyd going into the house there.

Bob Gale: The shot is dissolving through several takes on this dolly track at different times in the morning.


Chapter 3: "A Letter From Doc" - Transcribed by "Riverside Drive"


[OPENING AT DOC'S HOUSE; DOC AND MARTY ARE BOTH ASLEEP]

[Conversation continued from Chapter 2]

Bob Gale: People at the Gamble House loved the first movie, and they loved the way [cinematographer] Dean Cundey lit the house. When we went back there to ask permission to shoot the exterior again, they actually invited us to say, "We'll let you shoot inside." No film company has ever shot inside the Gamble House. We were very excited about the possibility of us being the first film crew in history to go in there and shoot. But I remember scouting it with everybody, and Bob [Zemeckis] and Neil [Canton] and I all kind of looked at each other after walking through this absolutely glorious example of period architecture, knowing that the film crew would tear holy hell out of this house, because film crews are very, very destructive. We decided to turn down this wonderful offer, because we figured we would do such terrible damage to the house. We didn't want to be responsible for being the film crew that wrecked the Gamble House.

Neil Canton: So we built a set.

Bob Gale: So we built a set. Blacker House, where we had filmed this material in the first movie, had been gutted by the new owners. All the great Craftsman fixtures had been torn out and sold off.

[DOC WAKES UP AND BEGINS SPEAKING INTO TAPE RECORDER]

Bob Gale: This was actually about the last thing we shot in "Back to the Future Part III".

Neil Canton: It was one of the last things we did.

Bob Gale: It was certainly Christopher Lloyd's last work on the show.

Bob Gale: You'll notice by the way, you just saw Doc's television in there, and we showed that he had a television in his laboratory, so Doc must be rich because he has two television sets, from the line from "Back I".

Bob Gale: This organ was a great idea of Bob Zemeckis' -- kind of the Captain Nemo reference there.

Bob Gale: Here's Doc's bathroom, where he was standing on his toilet, hanging the clock. And he finally did get the clock hung, as you'll see when the door opens.

Bob Gale: There it is.

Neil Canton: There it is.

[DOC READS THE LETTER HE WROTE TO MARTY]

Bob Gale: Again, talking about exposition -- this is it in its most pure form. And of course, it works. There's that second television that Doc has.

Bob Gale: [Production designer] Rick Carter re-created everything from the first movie here...the tabletop model, all these props, the brainwave machine there.

Bob Gale: There's the dog, Copernicus, there in the background. The original Copernicus from Part I was unavailable to do the sequel. Actually, the dog was the wrong color; we had to have the dog's coat dyed lighter...some kind of a terrier, to match the few brief moments you see of Copernicus in the first movie.

Bob Gale: This was one hell of a storm that Hill Valley had -- it's still raining here the next day. I love that chess set back there -- Doc figuring out how to play chess with his dog. The fanatics among you will remember that Doc did watch the videotape in Part I of the time travel experiment at Twin Pines Mall in which Einstein was involved in that. We never actually show Doc watching the dog experiment. You may wonder, why does Doc react that way when he finds out his dog's name is Einstein? Well, it's either a mistake that we made, or accept the fact that Doc didn't watch that part of the tape.

[DOC AND MARTY GO TO THE MINE TO DIG OUT THE DELOREAN]

Bob Gale: This was shot out in Agoura Hills, which is in the very west end of the San Fernando Valley. I can't remember the ranch property that it was. It was probably some property that Bob Hope owned, since it seemed like he owned everything back there.

[INSIDE THE MINE]

Bob Gale: This is a set of course. Stage 12 was our home away from home; we used Stage 12 in all three "Back to the Future" movies, and it was exclusively ours. It's the biggest stage that Universal has. We built many sets co-existing next to each other there.

Neil Canton: They used to refer to it as the "Back to the Future" stage.

Bob Gale: There was one time during Back II or Back III, when we had to clear the stage for Lew Wasserman's 50th anniversary in show business party. That was the one time that they told us, get off that stage...Wasserman needs this.

Bob Gale: There was a gag, and I don't remember if we filmed it or not -- I think we did but never put it in the movie - showing the tires disintegrating when Doc uncovered the DeLorean there. And therefore, when you see the DeLorean in its new version, it has these big giant whitewall tires. And for those of you too young to remember, "Made in Japan" in the 1950s was synonymous with being junk.


Chapter 4: "Doc's Destiny" - Transcribed by "Riverside Drive"


[DOC AND MARTY ARE LOADING THE EXCAVATED DELOREAN ONTO DOC'S TRUCK]

Bob Gale: Here we are back on the exterior location again.

Bob Gale: Chris Lloyd was sick when we shot this; he barely had any voice at all. But being the consummate stage-trained professional that he is, knowing that the show must go on, the fact that he was sick didn't prevent him from showing up for work and doing his lines, though we had to loop most of this, as I remember.

[MARTY FINDS DOC'S GRAVE]

Bob Gale: I think we had names of people on the crew on a lot of these tombstones...

Neil Canton: [laughs] We did...it was a good joke. People walked around looking for their names.

[DOC AND MARTY GO TO THE HILL VALLEY LIBRARY TO INVESTIGATE BUFORD TANNEN]

Bob Gale: There we have Buford in his correct Western look. If we were re-doing Back to the Future II, the shot of Buford on the "Life of Biff" documentary...we would have used that shot that you saw there.

[OVERHEAD SHOT OF DOC AND MARTY FROM THE LIBRARY CEILING]

Bob Gale: This is a great piece of work from ILM [Industrial Light & Magic] here. The art department had a great time creating these "authentic" old photographs of the McFly family...two Michael J. Fox's and two Lea Thompson's in that shot.

Bob Gale: One time, when Bob and I were trying to figure out what Back II was gonna be about - speaking of Doc Brown's history - we toyed with the idea of going back to the roaring '20s, and having an adventure involving Doc and Doc's mother and the Biff Tannen liquor bootlegging gang.


Chapter 5: "Back to 1885" - Transcribed by "Riverside Drive"


[DOC AND MARTY AT THE DRIVE-IN, PREPARING FOR MARTY'S TRIP TO 1885]

Bob Gale: This is Monument Valley, and it was about 17 degrees Fahrenheit when we shot these scenes. Right off the edge of the frame, the wardrobe people were standing with these huge parkas for Chris and Michael. It was really cold.

Neil Canton: Yeah, it was incredibly cold.

Bob Gale: Our location manager, Paul Pav, worked a miracle getting the Navajo Indians to agree to let us to build this drive-in set on their Indian land. Monument Valley is actually not a part of the United States - it's the Navajo nation. It's on the border of Utah and Arizona...

Neil Canton: ...made famous by all these John Ford Westerns.

Bob Gale: We just had to go here [Monument Valley] and shoot this stuff.

Bob Gale: You'll notice that the movies that are playing at the drive-in - the three movies are all sequels - Bob and I came up with that idea because everybody at the time was saying, 'There are too many sequels...what is going on with the movie business that we always have to make sequels.' So we put those movies on the marquee there to remind everybody that even in the '50s, sequels were very, very popular. It's "Francis in the Navy" (1955), an Abbott and Costello movie [most likely "Abbott and Costello Meet the Keystone Kops" (1955) or "Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy" (1955)], and a Ma and Pa Kettle Movie [most likely "Ma and Pa Kettle at Waikiki (1955)"

[NOTES:
-"Francis in the Navy" (1955) was the sixth and final movie in the "Francis" series. The first was "Francis" in 1950.
-"Abbott and Costello Meet the Keystone Kops" (1955) and "Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy" (1955) were the final two movies of ten total in the "Abbott and Costello" series. The first was "Abbott and Costello in Hollywood" in 1945.
-"Ma and Pa Kettle at Waikiki (1955)" was the seventh of nine movies in the "Ma and Pa Kettle" series. The first was "Ma and Pa Kettle" in 1949.]

Bob Gale: When we scouted this, the nearest airport to Monument Valley is in Page, Arizona, so we flew a private plane with a large number of our crew on it to scout it and figure out how we were gonna do it. On our trip back - this was in summer, July or August - it was very hot and there were these really extreme winds. It was so windy that the plane was buffeted by these winds...it was terrible. The pilot announced that we didn't have enough fuel to get back to Los Angeles, so they had to fly the plane into Las Vegas to re-fuel it.

Neil Canton: It made for a pretty terrifying plane flight.

[MARTY ARRIVES IN 1885 AND GETS CAUGHT UP IN THE INDIANS-CAVALRY CHASE]

Bob Gale: The section here, with the Indians and the cavalry - a large part of that was shot second unit, directed by Max Kleven, while we were shooting the Hill Valley stuff in Part III. This was shot I think in September or October...we shot all this stuff first and then the art department came in and built that drive-in.

Neil Canton: We flew in with Michael - just a handful of us flew in - to hook up with the second unit in order to get these shots.

Bob Gale: You went with the second unit there, didn't you Neil?

Neil Canton: Yeah, I went here with Michael and Bob, a couple other people. We flew in, did these shots and flew back out...it was on a weekend.

[MARTY BACKS THE DELOREAN INTO THE CAVE]

Bob Gale: The art department actually built that cave there.

Neil Canton: It was actually a lot of fun to do, being out there with all the...

Bob Gale: We stayed at Goulding's Lodge, where [Western director] John Ford and his crew would stay. Of course, John Ford's crew - they'd stay in tents.

Bob Gale: Some of this [the cave shots] was a set, on Stage 12 [sound stage at Universal], and some of it was on the real location.

Bob Gale: The [cavalry] riders, a lot of these people were called historical re-enactors - they actually travel around and re-enact cavalry charges and so forth - and the Indians were largely Navajos. I remember talking with some of the Navajos, and we were asking them, "You guys can ride horses?", and they're going, "We're Navajos, we're born on horses. We don't even need saddles."

Neil Canton: The re-enactors actually live out in tents and cook their food off of campfires and all that. We tried to put them up in hotels, but they wouldn't want us to do that.

Bob Gale: They refused.

Neil Canton: They really wanted to re-enact what it was like.

Bob Gale: Method acting [laughs].

Neil Canton: [laughs]

[MARTY ENCOUNTERS THE BEAR IN THE CAVE AND RUNS OUT]

Bob Gale: The leg there is actually a guy in a bear suit.

Bob Gale: We go over the hill [to the edge of the McFly farm] and we're back in California here. This location was right near where the graveyard location was.


Chapter 6: "Clint Eastwood?" - Transcribed by "Riverside Drive"


[MARTY WAKES UP IN THE MCFLY FARMHOUSE, THINKING IT'S ALL A DREAM]

Bob Gale: Of course we couldn't do a Back to the Future movie without having Lea Thompson in it, even though we can't tell you the McFlys were inter-marrying with the Baines family...we don't want to go there.

Neil Canton: We just wanted to get Lea in the movie.

Bob Gale: We just had to get Lea in the movie, and we had to re-do this motif that's in all three pictures. So we simply say that the McFly men are genetically predisposed to be attracted to women who look like Lea Thompson.

Bob Gale: We hired a dialect coach for the movie...his name was Tim Monich, and he was great, just a fanatic in understanding all the kinds of little subtleties about accents. He actually found out what county in Ireland the McFlys would have come from and made sure that the accent was accurate to that county. I can't tell you what county would have been.

Bob Gale: We did get permission from Clint Eastwood to use his name by the way. We figured we should do that...

Neil Canton: He was a fan of the movies.

Bob Gale: Yeah, he liked the movies.

[MARTY SITS DOWN FOR DINNER WITH MAGGIE AND SEAMUS MCFLY]

Neil Canton: This is a set we built.

Bob Gale: That food pass [plate of meat from Seamus to Marty] was made with an armature...the plate on an armature, very similar to Old Biff handing the almanac to his younger self in Part II. By the time we were doing this movie, we were much better at figuring out how to set up these shots.

Bob Gale: We wanted to add little touches to show that the West wasn't quite as romantic as it appears in some other movies, so we have dirty water and buckshot in the meat.

Bob Gale: Now, here the baby hand-off is very clever. Lea Thompson is gonna wipe the frame so that Seamus can hand baby William to Marty here.

Neil Canton: Perfect timing...

Bob Gale: If it wasn't perfect timing, we would have kept shooting it.

Neil Canton: We might still be doing it.

[SHOT OF BOTH SEAMUS AND MARTY TOGETHER ON-SCREEN]

Bob Gale: And this again is a Vista Glide shot, not blue screen. By the time we did the third movie, we realized that the best way to use this Vista Glide tool was to try to figure out how you would shoot the scene if you actually had different actors playing the parts and then let the audience believe that these are two different characters rather than always trying to show off the fact that you've got them and you're using the piece of equipment.

[MARTY WALKS INTO THE TOWN OF HILL VALLEY]

Bob Gale: We actually used the train tracks as dolly track...we put the camera on a little flat car.

Neil Canton: We're up in Jamestown in Northern California.

Bob Gale: This is gold country, Tuolumne County, which is just north of Yosemite National Park.

Neil Canton: We knew we needed the train in the movie, so we had to go find where the train tracks were to help decide where we were gonna build the town.

Bob Gale: The tourist attraction [in Jamestown] is called Railtown 1897, and it is the only functioning full-scale steam locomotive that exists certainly in the West and maybe the entire United States...I'm not sure about that. We researched Western towns in California. We knew that the Chinese would have been brought in to build the railroad...they usually lived on the outskirts of town in sort of a tent city, so there's that.

Neil Canton: [reads sign on manure cart] A. Jones, former relative of D. Jones [manure company owner from Part I]...

Bob Gale: Yeah, great-grandfather of D. Jones.

Bob Gale: The train in Jamestown has been used in dozens of movies and television shows, including: "Petticoat Junction" (1963-1970). [Director] Walter Hill used it in "The Long Riders" (1980) - I believe it was used in "High Noon" (1952) - and Clint Eastwood used it in "Pale Rider" (1985)...in fact, the train station there that you saw and you'll see again was the same train station that was built for "Pale Rider"...

Bob Gale: Everything else here, we built. This was the biggest construction job that ever took place adjacent to this railroad.

[MARTY WALKS INTO THE SALOON]

Bob Gale: This is a spectacular set that [production designer] Rick Carter designed - the only indoor-outdoor set, though some of the other buildings we used as storage for equipment.

Bob Gale: Dub Taylor, Harry Carey Jr., and Pat Buttram, three veteran character actors from Westerns. [Dub Taylor was also in Used Cars, directed by Bob Zemeckis and written by the Bobs, as the character "Tucker"]

Neil Canton: We were quite thrilled to get all three of them.

[SHOT OF THREE WOMEN LEANING OVER THE SECOND-FLOOR THE BALCONY INSIDE THE SALOON]

Bob Gale: The woman in the middle there is our script supervisor, Marion Tumen. She begged us to be a Western prostitute, and there it is.


Chapter 7: "Mad Dog" - Transcribed by "Riverside Drive"


[BUFORD TANNEN WALKS INTO THE SALOON AND ENCOUNTERS MARTY]

Bob Gale: Biff's gang here...Chris Wynne, who's the one on the left - the blonde - is an actor, and the other two guys [Sean Gregory Sullivan and Mike Watson] were primarily stuntmen. The ability to ride a horse, of course, was the number one qualification for being a member of Biff's gang. Walter Scott, our stunt co-ordinator, was really adamant about getting guys that were proficient on horses to be in Biff's gang. It turns out Chris Wynne had grown up around horses, so he was a pretty good rider, and the two other guys were excellent riders.

[NOTE: Of course, Bob Gale means "Buford" here, not "Biff"!]

Bob Gale: Tom Wilson - being from Philadelphia - he'd only ridden broken-down trail horses as tourists, but he spent weeks learning how to ride and rope and shoot.

Bob Gale: Our chief wrangler was Corky Randall [officially listed in the credits as "ramrod", not wrangler], a veteran of years and years of Westerns. We had something like 90 horses brought in for this. On the weekends, I remember, the horses needed to be walked and given exercise, so those of us who had kids would bring our kids around to the set on Saturday or Sunday, and the wranglers would let the kids go for horse rides. I remember, your daughter Neil, she just couldn't get enough of that.

Neil Canton: I have some great photographs.

Bob Gale: My daughter was only 18 or 19 months old, so she got on a horse, but she didn't know much about what she was doing.

Neil Canton: We had a lot of fun on this, because we were on location, away from LA. People had their families up there...it was a beautiful area.

Bob Gale: Don Burgess, who was the second unit director of photography - he moved his whole family up there, and enrolled his kids in the local school.

[MARTY RUNS OUT OF THE SALOON AS BUFORD AND HIS GANG CHASE HIM]

Bob Gale: We started shooting this is late August 1989, and we finished shooting in Tuolumne County - this area - in the middle of November, I think. I remember it was extremely hot in August and September...it would be upwards of a hundred degrees in the daytime.

[MARTY BEING DRAGGED BY ROPE ALONG THE GROUND BY BUFORD]

Bob Gale: The wide shots are [Michael J. Fox's longtime stunt double] Charlie Croughwell, and the close-ups...we actually dragged Michael around on the ground. Some of it was done on a horse, and some of it was done on this Benny the Car thing that Bob Zemeckis told you about on the other commentary, but the horse worked better.


Chapter 8: "Reunited" - Transcribed by "Riverside Drive"


[MARTY IS NEARLY HANGED BY BUFORD IN FRONT OF THE STILL-UNDER-CONSTRUCTION COURTHOUSE]

Bob Gale: We had Michael rigged with some ropes, so that we didn't really hang him, but nevertheless this was a very dangerous thing to do.

[DOC SHOWS UP AND SAVES MARTY'S LIFE]

Bob Gale: The property master [John Zemansky] made a gift to Bob Zemeckis of Doc's rifle here.

Bob Gale: Tom Wilson says that he based his characterization of Buford on Lee Marvin's Liberty Valance [in "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" (1962)], so there's a lot of that in here. Those of you who haven't seen "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance", go out and rent it...it's a terrific movie with great acting.

Neil Canton: Directed by John Ford, who we talked about earlier.

[BUFORD RECALLS HOW HE WAS DRINKING WHILE ON HIS HORSE]

Bob Gale: So, all throughout the Tannen family, the Tannens were drinking while they were on various modes of transportation. In Part I, Biff was drinking beer when he wrecked George's car at the beginning of the picture.

Bob Gale: Chris Lloyd has never looked better than he looks in this movie I think... the hat is great, that long duster coat. [Costume designer] Joanna Johnston did a fantastic job with the wardrobe on this show.

[DOC AND MARTY RETURN TO DOC'S BARN/BLACKSMITH SHOP]

Bob Gale: The nice thing about being able to build your own town was that we were able to orient all the buildings exactly the way they needed to be for some of the shots that Bob dreamed up in his head. So he was able to have this barn/blacksmith shop constructed so that it was oriented so that that back window would look out to the train tracks, and we could do the shot that is coming up with the train back there.

[THE MAYOR OF HILL VALLEY ARRIVES AT DOC'S BARN/BLACKSMITH SHOP]

Bob Gale: Hugh Gillin, who played the mayor here, actually was in Bob's student film that he shot in 1972 at USC [University of Southern California], called "Field of Honor". It was a wonderful reunion that Bob and Hugh had. Hugh did the movie [the student film] on an open casting call, never knowing if anything would ever come of it. Imagine his surprise that that kid that he did a movie for back in the '70s was now making a $45 million movie, and he was in it.

[DOC AND MARTY DISCUSS PLANS WHILE USING DOC'S ICE MACHINE]

Bob Gale: All this equipment here is a wonderful marriage between the art department and the special effects department...

Neil Canton: ...and a nightmare for the sound department. [Bob laughs]

Bob Gale: [Production sound mixer] Bill Kaplan liked this for the same reasons everybody else did - we were very far away from anything, and it was very quiet here. We moved the trucks with the generators a quarter or half a mile down the road...we had long runs of cable to bring electricity here, so that we wouldn't hear those generators. The downside to being in a very secluded, quiet area is that sound travels very far.

Neil Canton: We built baffles around the generator, to help Bill out.


Chapter 9: "Out Of Gas" - Transcribed by "Riverside Drive"


[DOC AND MARTY DISCUSSING PLANS IN HIS BARN/BLACKSMITH SHOP]

Bob Gale: Some people wonder why doesn't Doc go dig up the DeLorean that he's already hidden in the mine shaft for Marty to find in 1955 and use the gasoline out of there. Well, there's two reasons that I can give you for that. You'd drain the gasoline out of a car that you were gonna put in storage for that many years. And Doc would also have been hesitant about wanting to disturb the DeLorean, because you might break something on the DeLorean, and it would ruin the space-time continuum.

[DOC AND MARTY RIDE THE DELOREAN WHILE HORSES PULL IT]

Bob Gale: In that scene there, with the DeLorean being driven by horses - of course, Doc would know that there's no way they would have gotten the car up to that speed, but it was such a great image - it's sort of the signature image of this movie - we had to do that.

[DOC AND MARTY IN DOC'S BARN/BLACKSMITH SHOP TESTING THE LIQUOR/ALCOHOL FUEL]

Bob Gale: Here's the shot that brings us all the way to this window, and the camera keeps on moving all in one shot, and then the train comes in in the background. This is what you can do when you've got the time and the money and you're building your own sets. I don't remember how many times it took us to time this so the train pulled in right on cue.

Neil Canton: It took us quite a while, I think.

Bob Gale: You can't just start the train from standing still and have it appear.

[DOC AND MARTY AT THE TRAIN STATION]

Bob Gale: This [the train engineer] is Bill McKinney, another veteran character actor - for those of you who are familiar with the movie "Deliverance" (1972) he uttered the immortal line "[I bet you can] squeal like a pig." [as the character "Mountain Man"]

Bob Gale: Bob [Zemeckis] did a lot of very wonderful shots all in one take here.

Bob Gale: Watch carefully in this scene - you'll see in the background Mary Steenburgen is standing at the train station, waiting for somebody to pick her up.

[DOC AND MARTY LOOK AT THE MAP OF SHONASH RAVINE]

Bob Gale: There's Mary, and the clock back there as well.


Chapter 10: "Clara" - Transcribed by "Riverside Drive"


[DOC AND MARTY SCOUT OUT THE TRAIN TRACKS NEAR SHONASH/CLAYTON RAVINE]

Bob Gale: This trestle we built, this was about five or six miles from our primary location, and [production designer] Rick Carter and the art department built this trestle.

[DOC AND MARTY CHASE AFTER CLARA ON HORSEBACK]

Bob Gale: It was important for us to come up with a backstory and an alternate history for Clara Clayton, the Mary Steenburgen character. Since we knew that Doc was gonna end up with her at the end of the picture, we had to establish the idea that had Doc not been in the old West, she would have gotten killed, so that her surviving and living with Doc doesn't upset anything in the space-time continuum.

Bob Gale: For those of you that are unclear on the various different histories that would have happened:
-When Doc read about this in the history books growing up - and having not been back in the 1880s - Clara arrived at the train station, nobody was there to pick her up, she rented this buckboard, nobody was there to save her, she went over the cliff and died. So they [re-]named Shonash Ravine Clayton Ravine in her memory.
-In the alternate history, before Marty comes back, Doc Brown picked her up at the train station - that's how they met and fell in love.
-In this version, it's an amalgamation of the two - Doc wasn't there to pick her up at the train station, but he rescues her here - and Cupid fires his magic arrow

[DOC AND MARTY HELP CLARA GET HER BELONGINGS TO THE SCHOOLHOUSE]

Bob Gale: Mary Steenburgen was our first and only choice for this role. We never considered anybody else, and had she turned us down, I don't know what we would have done...we didn't have a backup idea.

Neil Canton: I remember, she came over to Amblin - she had lunch with us, to meet us - and we were so nervous that she was gonna not like us and decide to not do the movie. She told us a story that her children were so excited that she was offered this part that there was no way she could turn it down.

Bob Gale: Mary's kids, wherever you are, thank you! We're indebted to you for making your mom do this movie.

Bob Gale: This cabin and the adjacent schoolhouse - we built both of these for this movie. Bob got very spoiled, being able to have all these great building built to do exactly every camera move and everything that he wanted. By the time he did "Forrest Gump", he'd send [production designer] Rick Carter and [directory of cinematography] Don Burgess with a GPS unit to figure out exactly where the sun was gonna be. We did a little bit of that on this [movie], to know the sun would work for us, and not against us. When we made "Used Cars", we were always fighting the sun and hard shadows. Rick Carter paid careful attention to where the sun was gonna be, and we didn't have to worry about long and hard shadows or too much sunlight ruining our shots.

Bob Gale: Chris Lloyd had done enough movies where he, though not an accomplished rider, was very comfortable on horses. In fact, at the time he had a ranch in Montana. Michael J. Fox, of course, had not had any experience on horseback, so between [ramrod] Corky Randall and [stunt coordinator] Walter Scott, all the actors did a lot of practice on their riding.

[DOC AND MARTY TEST THE MODEL TRAIN/DELOREAN PLAN INSIDE DOC'S BARN/BLACKSMITH SHOP]

Bob Gale: The rail wheels that Doc is putting on the DeLorean there - it turns out that the carriage of a car is not too far off from the width of train tracks. When we were originally scouting this area, the folks at Railtown had a car that actually ran on the tracks with rail wheels on it. So we'd drive down these tracks in this car. When we took the whole crew out for a scout, we actually went on the train. I remember riding on that flat car.

Neil Canton: We had a party on the train.

Bob Gale: That's right...right before we started this, we had a kickoff barbecue. Everybody got to ride on the train for a couple of miles along the tracks to an area where we had a big barbecue, and Western music. It was a lot of fun.

Bob Gale: If you didn't notice, the vents on the back of the toy DeLorean there are bullets.

[CLARA SHOWS UP TO DOC'S BARN/BLACKSMITH SHOP WITH HER BROKEN TELESCOPE]

Bob Gale: This, of course, is a reference to the scene in Back to the Future Part I where Lea Thompson shows up to Doc's lab..."Quick, cover the DeLorean!"

Bob Gale: Mary Steenburgen's father was a conductor on freight trains, and I remember she was telling us how being around these trains brought back a lot of good memories for her.

Bob Gale: Storywise, what we're doing here is having Marty and Doc change places - Doc becoming the irresponsible one and Marty becoming the voice of reason.

Bob Gale: Michael's just kind of doing kind of what Chris Lloyd did in the first movie. They developed a great rapport...really enjoyed working with each other. Veterans of very different styles and schools of acting, Chris being a theater-trained actor and Michael being a TV-trained actor.


Chapter 11: "The Town Festival" - Transcribed by "Riverside Drive"


[OPENING SHOT OF HILL VALLEY MAYOR WELCOMING TOWNSPEOPLE]

Bob Gale: Originally, Bob had the idea of getting Ronald Reagan to play the mayor of Hill Valley -- it would have just been in this scene. Bob called up [Universal Studios chairman] Lew Wasserman -- Wasserman had been Reagan's agent -- and asked Lew to call Reagan, who of course was no longer president by 1989, and offer him this part. From what we understand, Reagan actually considered it but decided against it. It would have been great. Reagan, as you may have heard from the supplements on the first movie, was a big fan of the first "Back to the Future".

[DOC AND MARTY GET THEIR PHOTO TAKEN]

Neil Canton: That's [cinematographer] Dean Cundey...

Bob Gale: Dean Cundey, the still photographer [who takes the photograph of Doc and Marty].

[BAND PLAYS ON THE STAGE]

Bob Gale: This is ZZ Top, fronting for a group of local musicians.

Bob Gale: My best memories of shooting this movie was this scene, the town festival. We were shooting at night, in the summertime, so the weather was great. And it really felt like we were back in time.

Neil Canton: In between shots, ZZ Top would be playing with the local musicians. It was a nice atmosphere to have the music on the set.

Bob Gale: ZZ Top had absolutely no ego about hanging out with everybody. They were having as good a time as anybody else was.

Neil Canton: It turned out they were fans of the first two movies and were thrilled when we asked them to do this.

Bob Gale: Their manager just couldn't understand why we didn't want to put the ZZ Top car in the movie.

[DOC AND CLARA START TO DANCE TO THE MUSIC]

Neil Canton: We had a choreographer who spent a lot of time working with Chris and Mary on their dance routine.

Bob Gale: Mary actually sprained her ankle while she was practicing, and her ankle was all taped up with an Ace bandage. There was nothing we could do about that...we had to film these scenes when they were scheduled. She came through like the trooper that she is, and danced with her bandaged ankle.

Bob Gale: One of the inspirations for this style of dancing was another John Ford movie, "My Darling Clementine" (1946), where Henry Fonda dances in a rather strange fashion.

[MARTY ENCOUNTERS GUN SALESMAN]

Bob Gale: This is Burton Gilliam - he had a wonderful part in "Blazing Saddles" (1974).

Neil Canton: He had a small part in "Paper Moon" (1973).

Bob Gale: This joke here about 7-Eleven was another one of our jokes that didn't translate directly into foreign languages, because 7-Eleven wasn't very well known in foreign countries, certainly not as a place to go play video games. So in the foreign versions, instead of saying 7-Eleven, he says Disneyland.

[BUFORD AND HIS GANG ARRIVE AT THE FESTIVAL AND ENCOUNTER MARSHALL AND DEPUTY]

Bob Gale: This was Donovan Scott, playing the deputy - an actor that Bob and I got to know during production of "1941" (1979).

Bob Gale: We thought it would be wonderful to have at least one member of the Strickland family tree have an incredible head of hair, so went the General George Custer route here.

[STRICKLAND THREATENS BUFORD]

Bob Gale: One of the best things about doing a Western is being able to write lines of dialogue like that.

[MARSHALL STRICKLAND TELLS HIS SON, "REMEMBER THAT WORD: DISCIPLINE."]

Neil Canton: And we know that he does...

Bob Gale: A family tradition, that's right.

[MARTY AND SEAMUS WALK AND TALK NEXT TO EACH OTHER]

Bob Gale: I'm trying to remember...this was blue screen, wasn't it Neil?

Neil Canton: Yes.

Bob Gale: By not having the characters cross in front of each other, there was no reason not to shoot that [in] blue screen. It was just much easier. There were too many things that could change, shooting at night on a real location. I suppose it was [visual effects supervisor] Ken Ralston who must have asked us to do it that way to make his life a little bit easier.


Chapter 12: "Trouble With Tannen" - Transcribed by "Riverside Drive"


[BUFORD AND GANG APPROACH DOC, WHO IS STILL DANCING WITH CLARA]

Bob Gale: There's our homage to "My Darling Clementine"

Bob Gale: So in the version of history where Doc actually died, Buford did shoot him here, and it took him two whole days to die. Shot in the back, but just because he was shot in the back didn't mean that he died on that exact day - easy mistake to make, if you weren't familiar with small-caliber firearms.

[MARTY THROWS FRISBEE AT BUFORD'S GUN TO AVERT DISASTER]

Bob Gale: The legend of the Frisbee is that it actually got its name from the Frisbee Pie Company, which I think was in Pennsylvania. The guys who worked at the pie company tossed the pie plates around at lunchtime. That's how the Frisbee came to be known as a Frisbee.

[MARTY CONFRONTS BUFORD AND THEY DECIDE TO A SHOOTOUT]

Bob Gale: The actors, of course, had a great time playing around with this stuff [the jokes about timing and scheduling].

Bob Gale: This is all just a way for us to make the times work out properly, so when in doubt, turn it into a joke.

[MARTY WALKS OVER TO TALK TO DOC AND CLARA]

Bob Gale: I don't know how we got that baby to cry on cue like that. Nobody had any lines, so I guess we just ran the camera until the baby did something, and Michael turned his head.

Bob Gale: This is, of course, the Western version of the song, "Doubleback", that ZZ Top wrote for this picture. At the time we shot this scene, they hadn't written the song, so the band was playing something else with the same tempo.

[MARTY WALKS AWAY, TALKING TO SEAMUS]

Bob Gale: Once again, Bob working out a wonderful camera move to keep the frame active, keep everybody moving, and playing a lot of information all in one continuous take.

Bob Gale: This is blue screen here; we shot Seamus and Lea Thompson on location, and the Marty side of this was done much later, I think at ILM.

Neil Canton: Yes, it was at ILM.

Bob Gale: One of the bits of technology that we developed for this was to play back the performance in an earpiece that the actor would wear, so that an actor playing a scene with himself could hear the lines that he was playing against.

[DOC AND CLARA STARGAZING LATER THAT NIGHT]

Bob Gale: This scene here is Christopher Lloyd's first on-screen kiss. For as many movies that he's been in in his long and varied career up to this point, he never got a chance to kiss the girl, so this was a historic moment.

[THE NEXT MORNING IN DOC'S SHOP AS MARTY WAKES UP]

Bob Gale: When Back to the Future III came out, we had a very hard time trying to find anybody that wanted to do any publicity stories about the movie because they all felt, well six months ago we already did the Back to the Future sequel story when Back II came out.. So we were desperate to try to figure out how we could get some kind of a major press story about Back III, somehow. It turns out that Christopher Lloyd had never granted an interview; he's horrible in interviews. So our publicist did a major coup, and got the Sunday New York Times to agree to do a Sunday New York Times interview with Christopher Lloyd. This was after we had finished shooting the picture, and I remember talking to reporter to give her some background, and Chris was having lunch with this reporter. I was very anxiously awaiting to hear how it went, because I asked the reporter to call me after the interview was finished. She called me and told me that Chris basically said nothing. He's very shy in real life, and doesn't like to talk about himself. So she created the interview by interviewing Bob Zemeckis and Michael J. Fox and Mary Steenburgen, everybody around Chris, and kind of put words into his mouth. But it did run in the Sunday New York Times.

[MJF'S BUTT SHOT]

Bob Gale: I remember all the little girls squealing in the theater when they saw Michael's butt in that previous shot.


Chapter 13: "The Course Of The Future" - Transcribed by "Riverside Drive"


[MARTY WALKS THROUGH TOWN ON SATURDAY MORNING]

Bob Gale: The townspeople that talk to him here are all members of the crew. That's Michael Klastorin, the publicist, That's Michael Mills, one of our makeup artists [credited as "Michael John Mills"], and Kenny Myers with the Bible, another makeup artist. Everybody wanted to get into the old West, get into costume. The building back there under construction - I think we originally intended to finish that, but we ran out of money, so there was no reason why we couldn't just have a building under construction.

[MARTY SEES DOC AND GREETS HIM]

Bob Gale: [On the changing tombstone photo] Once again, here's that movie logic happening. We figured that as long as Doc Brown explains what the rules are here, you the audience will just go along with it. Since nobody has ever traveled through time to disprove what Doc is saying, it may be absolutely accurate.

Bob Gale: Doc and Marty...role reversal; they truly change places at this point.

Bob Gale: We had to bring reference to Marty's automobile accident here, because six months have gone by since Back to the Future Part II was in release, and we were very concerned that people wouldn't remember that. Maybe even with Doc saying it, they don't remember it.

[DOC AND MARTY HAVE A CONVERSATION AT "CAMP DELOREAN"]

Bob Gale: These train tracks here - this was working train tracks, and twice a day, the real train would come through. The assistant directors had a train schedule, and we always had a forklift standing by whenever we were working with the DeLorean on the train tracks. So five or ten minutes before the train was scheduled to come through, we could have the forklift driver, so that the train would pass through without destroying the DeLorean, or killing any members of our crew.

Bob Gale: This, again, is a scene done all in one shot...beautifully acted and orchestrated here.

Bob Gale: Al Silvestri's score is just perfect in this movie.

Bob Gale: This as I recall was one of the very last things that we shot on this location. We only had two actors by this time that we had to worry about, and that building [behind the train tracks] I think was something that was built for "Pale Rider" (1985).

Neil: Yeah, that's right, it was a "Pale Rider" building.

Bob Gale: As I mentioned in the last movie, Doc's bandana there is made of the shirt he was wearing in Back to the Future Part II.

[MARTY IS ASLEEP BY THE CAMPFIRE AND DOC IS THINKING OF CLARA AT "CAMP DELOREAN"]

Bob Gale: Wonderful to do a scene like that with no dialogue - you know exactly what Doc is thinking about.

[DOC VISITS CLARA AT THE SCHOOLHOUSE]

Bob Gale: I read a lot of material from the period to try to come up with the vocabulary that the characters would use, especially an educated woman like Clara...as well as the Bible, because the Bible was a primary source of education in those days, so some of the dialogue that she says in this scene, about "whoppers" and "mendacity" and so forth is great stuff I found from period writing.

Bob Gale: Mary just had a great way of delivering this, and it sounds terrific

Bob Gale: Of course, the master of period dialogue in these days was Mark Twain, my favorite author.

[NOTE: Bob Gale grew up in St. Louis, Missouri, about 100 miles from Hannibal, Missouri, where Mark Twain grew up]

[DOC LEAVES THE SCHOOLHOUSE]

Bob Gale: Again, the advantage of being able to build a set to do exactly what you want to happen in the story - this camera move here to go to the window sill, include the bed, and have Mary enter frame.

[DEJECTED DOC HEADS TO TOWN AND SPENDS THE NIGHT AT THE SALOON]

Bob Gale: The barbed-wire salesman there is Richard Dysart, mostly known to audiences from his starring role in the show "LA Law" (1986-1994).

Neil Canton: Quite an accomplished actor.

Bob Gale: He was also in "Pale Rider" (1985) - he was the villain in "Pale Rider". I think that might have been one of the reason why he was on our mind, having seen how great he was as a period character.

Neil Canton: We were nervous because we thought the part maybe wasn't big enough for him to do, but once again, it helps when people are fans of the movie.

Bob Gale: He had been doing "LA Law" for so long - I don't think anybody had put him in a movie in a couple of years - so he was also delighted to do something completely different than he was doing every week on TV.


Chapter 14: "Late For A Train" - Riverside Drive"


[MARTY WAKES UP ON MONDAY MORNING AT "CAMP DELOREAN"]

Bob Gale: The three old-timers there, we just kind of thought of them as the Greek Chorus, in the tradition of a play. They were a lot of fun to have around, they had stories. Harry Carey Jr., who was a veteran of all the John Ford movies we loved, he had a photographic memory. You'd get him started telling stories, and he'd just kept us mesmerized with some of the things he recalled. Everyone on the crew kept telling him he had to write his memoirs, and he did. The book was called "In the Company of Heroes", it's quite an enjoyable read.

Bob Gale: Pat Buttram on the right was a character in "Petticoat Junction" (1963-1970). Dub Taylor, somebody that Bob [Zemeckis] and I got to know from "1941" (1979) and "Used Cars" (1980). He talked so fast, sometimes you couldn't understand what he was saying.

[MARTY ENTERS SALOON AND FINDS DOC, WHO TAKES A SHOT AND GETS DRUNK]

Bob Gale: I'm trying to remember - did we come up with that joke at the time we were shooting it, that he only would have been holding it?.

Neil Canton: Yes.

Bob Gale: I think Matt Clark [Chester] might have thought of that one...much better solution than having Doc actually be a drunkard.

Neil Canton: We thought that Doc ultimately couldn't be drunk...people wouldn't want to see Doc drunk.

[MARTY PREPARES "WAKE-UP JUICE" FOR DOC]

Bob Gale: This, of course, is the result of our having watched too many "Three Stooges" shorts growing up.

Neil Canton: This actually won't work if you're drunk, so don't try it.

Bob Gale: Well, we don't know, actually. They might have had something back then that we don't have anymore - an illegal controlled substance that would have done this. No, doctors will tell you, the only antidote to being drunk is time; let it get out of your system.

[CLARA WAITS AT THE TRAIN STATION FOR THE TRAIN TO ARRIVE]

Bob Gale: That purple dress that Mary is wearing caused tremendous headaches for ILM. There was just a little bit too much blue in that purple. It made them crazy on blue screen stuff we do with her later on. But it's a great dress, and [costume designer] Joanna Johnston worked very hard to find that exact shade of purple, and she was adamant that that was the right color.


Chapter 15: "Showdown" - Transcribed by "Riverside Drive"


[SEAMUS ARRIVES AT THE SALOON AND BUFORD TANNEN AND HIS GANG ARRIVE TO THE TOWN CENTER FOR THE GUNFIGHT WITH MARTY]

Bob Gale: Very elaborate shot done with the Vista Glide, not blue screen. That was done with two passes.

Bob Gale: We figured, of course, in the old West nobody would be sure exactly what time it was, since the only way they had of figuring it out was originally from the sun. Once the railroads came in, they created time zones so that the trains could run on time.

Bob Gale: Tom Wilson is so great.

Neil Canton: He's fabulous in this sequence...

Bob Gale: Just so funny...

[MARTY WAITS INSIDE THE SALOON]

Bob Gale: In researching this and figuring out how we were gonna film it, we watched lots and lots of Westerns - everything from John Ford to Sergio Leone [director of "A Fistful of Dollars" (1964), among other Westerns].

Bob Gale: There was no Western where someone refused to take place in a gunfight like that, so this was a lot of fun.

Bob Gale: One of the things we noticed is that in most Westerns you have these long bars that have an "L" [shape] in them, or "U", so you can have characters face each other and not be in profile.

Bob Gale: You can do such great stuff with these cowboy hats - using them in your frame as you saw in the shot where Michael J. Fox looks up.

[MARTY AND DOC RUN OUTSIDE THROUGH THE BACK OF THE SALOON]

Bob Gale: I remember, we took the movie to preview, [and] the only point of contention was how many times did we show that stove door, the stove door that he uses it for the bulletproof vest - whether seeing it in that one shot was enough, or if we needed him to look at it a second time. My recollection is, we previewed it where it is here, and everybody got it. Bob [Zemeckis] was worried about that.

Neil Canton: So we just left it, with the one time.

Bob Gale: He thought we might need to see it again, but we don't.

Neil Canton: We also didn't want to give it away.

Bob Gale: We didn't want to telegraph it. You have to be careful in terms of how you set stuff up. You can't make it too obvious. You wanna have that moment of reveal work so that when the audience sees it, they say 'Of course, I remember that stove door!'

[CLARA IS ON THE TRAIN AND OVERHEARS CONVERSATION ABOUT DOC]

Bob Gale: This line of Mary's here is my wife's idea, actually. I had originally written it, 'Did he have wild eyes and unkempt hair?' She said, no, she's in love with him. She would have all of these wonderful descriptions of him, and she's right.

[MARTY APPEARS OUTSIDE FOR HIS GUNFIGHT WITH BUFORD]

Bob Gale: We used every single shot that's ever been in a Western gunfight in this sequence here.

Neil Canton: I thought this might be the only opportunity we'd ever get to make a Western, so we used them all.

Bob Gale: That was Tom Wilson actually twirling the gun like that. There was a guy named Arvo Ojala, whose job was to instruct actors on how to handle firearms. He was a quickdraw artist, and he taught Tom how to do that. That's one of the great things about America - there's a job for everybody, and this guy was able to make a living out of being a quickdraw artist. [He was also a gun coach on "Three Amigos!" (1986)]

[BUFORD SHOOTS MARTY AND HITS HIS BULLET-PROOF VEST]

Bob Gale: All we can say is, thank God Buford didn't shoot him in the head.

Neil Canton: Tom's so great here, this walk.

Bob Gale: That little whip he has in his hand, that's a direct reference to "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance", as is the knife. We actually had flies all over the place. You'll find them on the outtakes - a shot where Michael J. Fox is laying there, and a fly actually lands in his face. The other thing that we had plenty of shooting here was dust; there was so much dust. Some of the crew actually took to wearing those paint masks to keep dust out of their lungs. A lot of us had coughs for several months after this from inhaling all this stuff.

Neil Canton: You can't have a "Back to the Future" without a manure gag.

[BUFORD AND HIS GANG ARE ARRESTED BY THE DEPUTY MARSHAL]

Bob Gale: You'll see in the deleted scenes a scene where Buford actually kills Marshal Strickland, and that's why it's not Marshal Strickland who rides up here to arrest Tannen.

Bob Gale: What he actually said is, 'You're under arrest for the murder of Marshal James Strickland', and we cut away to excise that line of dialogue. We decided that it was too grim to actually have this murder committed in the movie; it put a pallor on everything, and it also made the audience want Marty to kill Buford because he shot Strickland in the back.

[MARTY SPEAKS BRIEFLY WITH SEAMUS BEFORE LEAVING WITH DOC]

Bob Gale: Here, this was just done with doubles here, or not even doubles, two closeups. No reason to have them both in the frame, we've seen it enough.

[CLARA FINDS THE TRAIN TRACKS MODEL INSIDE DOC'S LAB AND HEADS TOWARD THE TRACKS TO FIND DOC]

Bob Gale: Wonderful example here of using the same thing to do two different things dramatically.

[SHOT OF DOC AND MARTY ON HORSEBACK]

Neil Canton: This is some great, great riding.


Chapter 16: "Racing Against Time" - Transcribed by "QXR37"


[MARTY AND DOC RIDING ON RAILS BEHIND TRAIN]

Neil Canton: This is some great, great riding here. It's very hard to do, to ride in between the rails like that.

Bob Gale: Yeah, the horses definitely don't want to do that. As Bob explained on the other track, there was always a horse ahead of the horse for the horse to follow, for the actor's horse to follow. Whenever you see an actor on it there was another horse there, when there was a stuntman there may not have been.

[CLARA RIDES OUT OF BARN]

Bob Gale: Jennifer Watson was Mary's stunt double, RL Tolbert was Christopher Lloyd's, and Charlie Croughwell is Michael J. Fox's stunt double.

[MARTY JUMPS ONTO TRAIN CAR WITH LOGS ON IT]

Bob Gale: We would have flat cars either in front of or behind the train, with all the crew moving along with the shooting. And sometimes we actually had the camera rig built on the flat car.

[DOC: 'IT'S A SCIENCE EXPERIMENT']

Bob Gale: [laughing] That's one of my favorite lines in this movie.

Neil Canton: Me too, I've always liked that one.

[MARTY RUNS UP TO THE TRACK-SWITCH]

Neil Canton: We had some problems when we were filming this part here because we had...down the line [?] we got into some kind of airplane flight path, and we'd see the trails in the sky -

Bob Gale: Oh, the contrails.

Neil Canton: The contrails in the sky, and so we kept having to wait for those to disappear.

Bob Gale: Whether or not you see contrails is completely weather-dependent, depending on how warm or cold it is, and how much humidity there is, creates the conditions for very visible contrails or none at all.

[TRAIN SLOWS DOWN IN FRONT OF DELOREAN]

Bob Gale: The real engineer was on the opposite side of the locomotive from where Chris Lloyd is. We learned that you can operate the train from either side.

[TRAIN STARTS MOVING WITH DELOREAN ATTACHED TO FRONT]

Bob Gale: The actual number of the train was number three, so we put ones on either side of it.

[DOC: 'MARTY, ARE THE TIME CIRCUITS ON?']

Neil Canton: We were filming a lot of this sequence at the same time that we were finishing the final dub on Back II...

Bob Gale: Right, so Neil was on the set all the time, and I wasn't.

Neil Canton: ...and Bob was down in Los Angeles on the dub stage. And Bob Z. and I would work until 4:30, 'cause it was all daytime exterior and we were losing the light up in Jamestown, and they'd drive us to Columbia, which was a neighboring town that had a tiny airstrip, and we had a charter plane and we'd fly down to Burbank, and then drive over to Universal, and see what had happened on the stage, on the dub, and then go check some ILM shots that were coming in.

Bob Gale: Right.

Neil Canton: Then go to sleep and then get up the next mor - you know, they'd pick us up like at 4:30 in the morning and we'd fly back up to Jamestown and start working again at 7. And we did that, at first it was a lot of fun and we had a lot of laughs when we got on the plane, and by day four we were so tired we wouldn't even talk to each other, we would just get on the plane and go to sleep. And we did that for about a week and a half I think.

Bob Gale: I think it was two or three weeks, actually.

[CLARA CLIMBS UP BACK CAR, CALLS OUT 'EMMETT!']

Bob Gale: There was a section of road that paralleled the track for about a half a mile, so that we were able to put a camera car on the road and shoot alongside of the train. So some of the shots comin' up here where the camera's tracking alongside the train had to be done on that half-mile run of track.

[DELOREAN PASSES 40 MPH]

Bob Gale: And getting the colored smoke, I remember, that was a big pain in the ass.

Neil Canton: [chuckles] It was.

[DOC EDGES ALONG SIDE OF LOCOMOTIVE]

Neil Canton: This was a very hard sequence to do.

[DOC CLIMBS ON FRONT OF LOCOMOTIVE]

Bob Gale: Michael Lantieri, our mechanical effects supervisor, actually figured out a way to rig something on the DeLorean so that it would completely fall off the track in case it started to derail, 'cause we were very worried that something that happened[?], and the locomotive would, the DeLorean would fall off the tracks and the locomotive would destroy it. I don't remember that that ever happened though...

Neil Canton: No, it didn't happen, but we were worried about it. Especially, y'know, we had Michael in and our stuntman in it...

Bob Gale: So these shots here where Michael's in the DeLorean where you don't see the train, the car was just being pushed by another car behind it. In the couple of shots where he's in it and you see the train, those were shot backwards, because the insurance company didn't like the idea of having the lead actor with 80 tons of locomotive behind him, with a cheap little stainless steel DeLorean. So we knew that if the train was going backwards, pulling the DeLorean instead of pushing it, if they got uncoupled or anything, the train would keep going and nothing would happen to the DeLorean or Michael J. Fox.

[CLARA EDGES ALONG SIDE OF LOCOMOTIVE]

Neil Canton: This sequence was all storyboarded, and we would look forward to Xing out the shots as we got 'em.

Bob Gale: We did have Chris and Mary actually climbing out onboard this train.

[RED LOG BLOWS, CLARA IS LEFT DANGLING BY HER DRESS]

Bob Gale: So the shots of Mary hanging down there with her head near the wheels, those were done at ILM and[?] some bluescreen. And then the other stuff, the big wide shots, Jennifer Watson was hanging upside down there.

[DOC RESCUES CLARA WITH HOVERBOARD]

Bob Gale: Bluescreen shot comin' up here, with them hovering away.

[SHOT OF TRAIN AND DELOREAN APPROACHING END OF TRACK FROM ABOVE]

Bob Gale: And now that's all miniature now. One of the greatest miniatures that ILM built, just spectacular.

[SHOT OF TRAIN GOING INTO RAVINE]

Bob Gale: Bob decided, this was shot with 6 or 8 cameras, but Bob decided it would be more effective to just watch the whole train come down all in one shot. I think he was right, I think it makes it more immediate.


Chapter 17: "Back to Normal" - Transcribed by "QXR37"


[SHOT OF BRIDGE FROM ABOVE AS DELOREAN APPEARS IN 1985]

Bob Gale: This, of course, is another miniature.

[SHOT OF DELOREAN RIDING TRACKS TOWARDS INTERSECTION]

Neil Canton: Now we're in Oxnard.

Bob Gale: Near Port Hueneme - these train tracks are about six blocks away from the ocean. The art department built that red bridge superstructure back there in the background, of course there's no bridge back there really.

[DELOREAN PASSES HILLDALE SIGN]

Bob Gale: Bob Zemeckis was unable to scout this location, because he was busy shooting the movie. So, Paul Pav found it and took me there, and I videotaped it and brought the videotape up to Bob on location, and I tried to shoot every possible angle that I thought he might wanna shoot there, and so he signed off on the location by looking at it on a videotape.

[TRAIN SMASHES DELOREAN]

Bob Gale: The DeLorean explosion there was enhanced by Michael Lantieri and his guys, they put a little bit of primer cord in the car and detonated it just at the point of impact.

[MARTY RUNS BACK THROUGH LYON ESTATES ENTRY]

Bob Gale: We went back to Arleta...three times, I guess, during the course of making this movie...making these movies, I should say. People that lived in that house made a lotta money off of us. [laughs]

Neil Canton: [laughs] They were almost like family.

[MARTY'S FAMILY COMES OUTSIDE]

Bob Gale: Again, to keep your attention away from the fact that it's Jeffrey Weissman playing George McFly there, we put him in sunglasses, made a bit out of the fact that he couldn't find his other glasses, and kept him in the background, throw him a little bit out of focus.

[MARTY'S 4X4 PULLS INTO JENNIFER'S DRIVEWAY]

Neil Canton: And here we are back at Jennifer's house which we...shot...

Bob Gale: ...which we shot during Part II.

Neil Canton: ...Part II, that's right.

Bob Gale: The nice clean version, no bars on the windows, the station wagon in the driveway is intact, if you take another look at part II you'll see that it's a wreck.

[MARTY KISSES JENNIFER]

Bob Gale: And finally Marty gets to kiss her. It took three movies. [both laugh]

Neil Canton: Everyone gets a kiss in this movie [both laugh].


Chapter 18: "Marty's Choice" - Transcribed by "QXR37"



[SHOT OF MARTY'S 4X4 DRIVING DOWN RESIDENTIAL STREET]

Bob Gale: This was also shot in Oxnard. All these townhouse developments look pretty much the same. So this was good because it had this farmland across the street from it, giving the idea that everything was still being built and under construction. I don't think the folks in El Monte or Baldwin Park, wherever that was, would've wanted to have us back anyway.

[NEEDLES PULL UP NEXT TO MARTY'S TRUCK AT A TRAFFIC LIGHT]

Bob Gale: The members of Needles' gang there, it's one member from each one of Biff's gang in different time periods. There's Chris Wynne from the west, and in the back are J.J. Cohen from the '50s and Ricky Dean Logan from the future. "Power Of Love", of course, playing on the radio, couldn't not have that in the movie...[we] used it in all three.


Chapter 19: "Meet The Family" - Transcribed by "QXR37"


[MARTY AND JENNIFER RETURN TO THE TRAIN TRACKS SITE WHERE THE DELOREAN WAS DESTROYED]

Bob Gale: The remnants of Mr. Fusion, which [mechanical effects supervisor] Michael Lantieri took and built a lamp for me out of it. It sat on my desk at Amblin for many, many years.

[MARTY LOOKS AT TORN PHOTOGRAPH OF DOC STANDING NEXT TO THE CLOCK]

Bob Gale: That's of course what's left of the photograph that Marty brought back with him from the '50s. If it was complete, would it have had Marty in the shot? Well, that's a mystery of time travel...but, I guess it would've

Neil Canton: I think it would've.

[DOC'S TIME TRAIN APPEARS IN THE SKY AND LANDS IN FRONT OF MARTY AND JENNIFER]

Bob Gale: This is not a miniature...this is a full scale prop here. And to keep it under wraps, the art department and the effects team actually had to build a garage around it so that people that lived in the area wouldn't see it. They had to build it very close to where the tracks were because it wasn't the easiest thing to move around. And last time I checked, that was available to see on the Universal [Studios] tour in Florida, but I haven't checked into it lately, so who knows if it's still there.

Bob Gale: The design of this is inspired by the Walt Disney "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" (1954), the look of the Nautilus.

Bob Gale: And Doc's wardrobe here was inspired by Professor Marvel in Wizard of Oz, at the very end of that movie.

Bob Gale: In case you're wondering what the "L" stands for in ELB...Lathrop. Doc's mom's maiden name.

["Time Portal" spelt backwards gives you "emit latrop", which is similar to "Emmett Lathrop" which suggests it was an in-joke by the Bobs]

[DOC AND HIS FAMILY TAKE OFF IN THE TIME TRAIN AND HEAD BACK TO THE FUTURE]

Bob Gale: So now, this of course is a miniature. But except for this shot, it was all full-scale prop.

["THE END" APPEARS ON SCREEN AS CREDITS ROLL]

Bob Gale: It is the end...sorry, no Back to the Future Part IV.

Neil Canton: But thanks for watching.

Bob Gale: And we hope you enjoyed yourself.


Chapter 20: "Credits"


[NO COMMENTARY OVER THE CREDITS]

THE END



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Der Tachometer des DeLorean geht bis 95 MpH. Laut amerikanischer Gesetzgebung 1985 gingen die Tachos von DeLoreans nur bis 85 MpH! Zu wenig für die Zeitreisen...
(» Fotos des Tachos)






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